Preventive Dentistry Meets Cosmetic Dentistry

Many times preventive dentistry and cosmetic dentistry are split into two separate ways of thinking.

However more and more dental practices are now considering the blending of these two disciplines to ensure that preventive dentistry is always cosmetic and looks good, and that cosmetic dentistry always is as minimally invasive as possible.

This trend in dentistry is appealing to the patients and is encouraging more people to go back to see the dentist.

What is minimally invasive dentistry?

In years gone by one of the only ways of treating a patient that did not like the teeth was to cut the teeth down into stumps and place crowns (dental caps).

Then as the years progressed dental veneers became more common, these often only required a small reduction of the natural tooth with the thin and high-strength dental veneer being bonded to the surface.

The progression from this type of dental veneer led on to what is known as no-prep veneers popularised by Lumineers. The technique involves no reduction of the natural tooth tool and simply bonding the new, custom-made dental veneer to the surface of the existing to.

This type of zero preparation veneer can only be used in certain circumstances where the tooth is rather in standing. Having no preparation of the existing tooth can also, in some situations, compromised the way the dental veneer fits against the natural tooth. If this junction is compromised it can leave areas for bacteria to infiltrate and cause dental decay and disease.

Unfortunately zero preparation veneers have often been prescribed when perhaps an alternative option would have been better, typically this is down to patient pressure requesting this type of dental veneer often after seeing an advert for no preparation veneers requiring no dental injection.

The most recent advancement in minimally invasive dentistry is the use of dental bonding. This involves placing a small amount of high-strength yet malleable composite material directly onto the tooth by the dentist. The dentist slowly build up the tooth into the new shade by adding small amounts of material at a time, curing that material between each addition using a high-strength light.

These light-sensitive or light curing materials are provided to the dentist in a range of colours which closely match your natural tooth.

The final part of minimally invasive dentistry is to consider moving teeth, rather than restoring teeth. If the natural teeth are actually in good condition but simply in the wrong place, rather than make additions to the front of the teeth to build them into the correct place (by using either dental veneers or dental bonding) the minimally invasive dentist will prefer to move teeth using orthodontics.

“More and more patients are requiring that we move teeth to the correct position using invisible orthodontics, this is preferable to cutting down the teeth and making dental crowns or veneers in many cases. For anyone that is looking for a more healthy and holistic approach to dentistry this is certainly on the top of things to look out for”

Says Sia Maani from IQ Dental in Kent.

When you come to consider orthodontics you really need to ask what type you want. Generally speaking fixed orthodontics is preferred by are a lot of dentists due to its ability to move teeth naturally and quickly, however with modern advances in clear braces and teeth coloured braces these are becoming more popular as patients wish to have orthodontics with no one else knowing.

The advice of cosmetic-dental-treatments.info is to discuss your wants and desires with the dentist rather than ask for a specific treatment. If you tell your dentist what it is that you want as an outcome they can then decide on the best way to achieve this in the way that fits with your lifestyle the best.