What everyone should know before getting dental braces

Want to get back you nice smile and you need braces, but don’t know what to expect?

What are the costs? What are the best types available? What are the steps involved? What are the risks involved? Are they painful?

Fear not, by the end of this article, you’ll have an answer to all of these questions and some!

Ready? Let’s dive right in!

What types of dental braces are there available?

Traditional Braces

You might think of these braces as those awful ones like in The Ugly Betty.

Well, this is what they used to look like. But not anymore. They are now much lighter in weight and structure than they used to be.

They are made from a high-grade stainless steel and have metal brackets that are attached to each tooth using some kind of cement.

Each bracket is linked to the other one with a thin archwire basically drags your teeth (slowly) in the correct position.

These archwires are in turn attached to the brackets using tiny elastics known as ligatures or o-rings.

Ceramic Braces

These are very similar to the traditional braces. They work the same way, but the braces are made from a clear, transparent ceramic material.

The advantage over the traditional braces is that they are less visible to others.

The disadvantage is that sometimes patients might  occasionally find that the elastics become discolored, which can cause marks on the teeth.

Fortunately, your orthodontist might recommend you to use a special solution to apply to your teeth in order to protect them against cavities.

Damon Braces

This is one of the most popular type of dentists because it provides gentler treatment and you have to go less often to your dentist. So you also save time and money.

But this is not the only advantage.

Damon braces are self-ligating and use a slide mechanism instead of elastics to connect the archwires.

This means you will see faster results because your teeth can move on their own, without needing to be adjusted.

And because the braces are self-ligating, they cause put less pressure on your teeth, so you feel less pain.

And there’s one more advantage to this. It’s also easier to keep them clean.

Clear and Removable Aligners

Invisalign is like a mouth guard with the advantage that it aligns your teeth.

You can remove them anytime you want and you can clean them whenever you want.

The disadvantage of this type of braces is that you have to change them out for a newly made one every two weeks. This is because one the aligner brings your teeth closer, it isn’t good anymore. So basically, each new aligner takes the adjustment of your teeth one step further.

Forsus Appliances

The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that children get screened by an orthodontist at the age of 7.

This is because at this age you have the most chances to correct your teeth fast.  

As you can see from the picture above, this device basically uses a spring that attaches to the braces and adjusts the upper or lower jaw into position.

Palatal Expanders

When you have overcrowded teeth, you have 2 options: extract the tooth or use palatal expansion.

In the past, tooth extraction was preferred. But today, fortunately, you can save your teeth by wearing this device which basically applies pressure to the back of your upper molars to gradually move your teeth farther apart.

This expands your palate and makes it possible for other types of braces to be fitted to correct the position of your teeth.

What are the best type of braces?

As you’ve already seen, there isn’t a “best type”.

You choose your dental braces based on 3 factors:

  1. How overcrowded your teeth are (severe cases require different type of braces)
  2. How visible/comfortable you want them to be
  3. What is your budget (Invisalign costs a bit more than traditional ones)

Either way, only your dentist can tell you for sure what type of dental braces you actually NEED.

Are dental braces painful?

The answer is both yes and no.

You will feel a mild soreness or discomfort after the orthodontic wire is engaged into the newly placed brackets.

This discomfort may may last for a few days to a week while your teeth will be a bit more sensible when you bite, depending on how hard is the food you eat.

Either way, you won’t feel any deep pains.

Another discomfort you may also feel at first is that you may feel that your braces are sticking out, which is completely normal.

As you get used to your braces and tooth alignment improves, this sensation will disappear and will cease to be a concern.  

In fact, when you get your braces off, your teeth will feel strange without them for a while, too!

How much do dental braces cost?

Again, it depends.

But here are some numbers, just to get an idea.

  • Metal braces (traditional braces) : $3,000 – 7,000
  • Ceramic braces : $4,000 – 8,000
  • Lingual braces : $8,000 – 10,000
  • Invisalign : $4,000 – 7,400

What are the next steps?

If you have overcrowded teeth, only your dentist can give you a pertinent advice. Depending on the severity of your problem, he can recommend you what you should do next.

But one thing is for sure, the sooner you go to a dentist, the sooner you’ll get back your beautiful smile!

About the author

Patrik Bindea is a growth hacking marketer and the owner of Strodin Dental Marketing Company, where he helps dentists get more patients. He obsessively tests different marketing ideas until he finds those details that turn strategies, concepts and words into sales.  

How does a dentist fill a cavity?

Pain from cavities is one of the most horrible experiences you can endure in life. Due to their proximity to several nerves, ignoring toothache is nearly impossible.

If you are in pain, find a dentist near you and visit him right away no matter how much you hate them. Thankfully, modern dentistry is relatively pain-free, and you can experience some relief in a matter of hours.

 Have you ever wondered what exactly a dentist does to take away your pain?

A qualified dental professional takes several steps to save your teeth and provide you with some immediate relief.

If your face is swollen, it means the bacteria has spread beyond the teeth and caused an infection in your mouth and maybe even your jaw. The first step would be to stop the infection from spreading further. Your dentist might prescribe a course of strong antibiotics and painkillers. The painkillers will give you relief from a toothache while the antibiotics control infection and reduce the swelling.

Your dentist is likely to take an x-ray to figure out the extent of the damage. If the cavity is not very extensive, a surface filling will suffice. But if it goes too deep, it may need a root canal, a filling, and a cap. In some cases, if the tooth is no longer salvageable, he may have to extract it completely to prevent further damage to the gum.

Once you are relatively pain-free and the dentist is certain of having controlled the infection, it is time to drill your teeth. A local anesthetic is used to numb your jaws. Some dentists may even give you nitrous oxide to calm you if you have too much anxiety about dental work.

Anatomy of a tooth including the pulpOnce the jaw is numb, and you are relaxed, the dentist will use a water drill to create an opening to reach your cavities. The extent of the drill is determined by how far the cavity has reached. If only a part of your teeth is affected and the roots are untouched, he will drill to remove the cavity completely, until he reaches healthy teeth material.

But if the root and pulp are affected, your dentist may use special tools to perform a root canal treatment. He will remove dead roots and nerves, apply some antibiotic and put a temporary seal in place. The antibiotic will kill any remaining bacteria and the temporary seal will ensure food particles do not enter the cavity.




Your dentist may suggest a follow up in 3-4 days to continue the work. In the next session, he may insert some needles into the cavity and take another x-ray to ensure all roots are covered. He may perform another root canal cleaning if he notices further decay. The gap between the first procedure and second allows him time to evaluate if there is any secondary infection or decay.

This time, a dental assistant would take a mold of your affected teeth to order for a custom cap in case you had a root canal.

If your teeth decay is superficial or only a few millimeters deep, your dentist is likely to seal it with an inert material.

Typically, it could be filled with metallic fillings like gold, amalgams like silver, a composite material like resins of quartz or glass or even ceramic substance.

Amalgams have been a popular filling for the last 100 years. Made of several metals, they are strong and lasts a lifetime. They are also the least expensive material to be used as a filling. But in the last two decades, there is a rapid reduction in its usage due to fear of mercury leeching into the body. So, none of the dentists in western countries use it anymore.

If you can afford it, gold is considered as one of the best filling materials. Ceramic is becoming the most popular option due to its low cost and low maintenance nature.

You get to choose which kind of filling you want, especially if it is a surface filling.

But if your decay goes deep and you need a cap, the filling material becomes less important since no one can see it. A ceramic filling is most commonly used when treating root canal decay.

But you can choose the type of cap for your tooth. You can choose an expensive porcelain cap, a gold one or a combination of dental ceramic and a metal alloy. The cap will be put on the teeth and sealed permanently. While you may notice this cap in the beginning as it feels foreign in your mouth, within a few days, it becomes normal, and you can treat it like your other teeth.

Cavities are a tricky business and should never be neglected. The faster they are treated, higher are your chances of saving your teeth. If you dive underwater, make sure you tell your dentist about it. He may use special techniques to ensure there is no air bubbles or gaps within the filling. This way, even when you go underwater, you are free from a toothache.


This article is a guest post.

How do Braces Behind the Teeth Work?

When we talk about braces, the first thing that comes to mind is the shiny metallic brackets which are attached at the front of our teeth, and how they become visible while speaking or smiling. On the other hand, braces are one of the most efficient methods of straightening crooked or misaligned teeth. So, what if we could utilize the effectiveness of teeth braces while avoiding their anesthetic appearance? Yes, that’s possible, thanks to braces behind the teeth, or lingual braces.

lingual braces
WIN – Lingual Braces (other systems are available)

What are Braces Behind the Teeth?

Unlike the conventional braces, lingual braces are attached at the back of our teeth. In this way, they are completely invisible, and they do not affect your smile and facial esthetics. They are attached to the inner surfaces of the teeth in a similar way which is used for conventional braces.



What are the Steps in Getting Braces Behind the Teeth?

The process for getting braces behind the teeth is similar to the conventional metal braces.

  • Examination and Treatment Planning – First, your dentist will perform a detailed clinical examination of your teeth to ascertain whether you are a suitable candidate. Next, after thoroughly evaluating the study models and radiographic images of your teeth and surrounding structures, a detailed treatment plan will be prepared which will be customized according to your dental needs.
  • Attaching the Brackets – In the next appointment, your dentist will attach braces at the back of your teeth and pass the archwire. You may feel slight discomfort or chaffing of the tongue in the early days. However, you will get used to it very soon.

How Braces Behind the Teeth Work?

Lingual braces work in a similar way to the braces which are attached at the front of teeth. Each bracket consists of small slots through which the archwire passes.

  • The Arch Wires – The archwire is attached to the teeth by using rubber elastics, or ties. The relative tightness/springiness of the archwire generates a force which moves the teeth into the desired direction.
  • Adjustments – After every 6-8 weeks, your orthodontist will adjust or replace the archwire so that the teeth continue to move towards ideal alignment.
  • Consolidation – Once the treatment has been completed, your orthodontist will give you a fixed or removable retainer which will make sure that your teeth do not move back into their previous position.

Braces behind the teeth offer several benefits over the conventional brackets, like superior aesthetics and in some cases, a shorter treatment time. On the other, they are not suitable for treating all types of orthodontic problems. In addition, some patients complain of difficulty in eating and speech. The lingual braces are also slightly more expensive than the conventional ones. However, if we compare them with the Invisalign aligners, they are certainly one step ahead in terms of efficiency and speed of treatment. So, if you’re looking for combining the superior efficiency of conventional braces with the virtual invisibility of Invisalign aligners, braces behind the teeth should be your first option!

Mouth cancer – Symptoms and Causes

Cancer is the uncontrollable multiplication of harmful cells that attack cause damage surrounding body tissue. Mouth cancer looks simply like a growth or a persistent sore in your mouth. Unless it is diagnosed early and treated correctly, oral cancer can become a threat to life.

Symptoms

The commonest symptoms of mouth cancer could be one or more of the following.

  • Swellings or thickening of flesh, or lumps, especially those which are painless and persistent ones
  • Crusts, rough spots or eroded patches anywhere on the gums, lips, or within your mouth
  • The appearance of velvety patches in the mouth which could be white or red (or speckled).
  • Bleeding within the mouth for no apparent reason.
  • Unexplained sensory abnormality (pain or tenderness, numbness or reduced sensitivity in any part of the, face, neck, or mouth.
  • Sores in the mouth or in the face and neck that start bleeding easily and last for over two weeks
  • A chronic sore throat or a feeling in the throat as if something may be stuck in the throat
  • Some difficulty in swallowing, speaking, chewing, or in moving your tongue or the jaw.
  • Chronic hoarseness or a change in your voice.
  • Frequent pain in the ear.
  • A changed bite (how the upper and lower teeth fit together).
  • A noticeable loss in body weight.




What Can Cause Mouth Cancer?

As advised by the American Cancer Society, American males are twice as likely to get mouth cancer as females. Further, males older than 50 stand the highest risk. It has been estimated that more than forty thousand persons in the United States were diagnosed with mouth cancer in the year 2014.

Prominent factors linked with oral cancer are:

  • Smoking – tobacco smoking in any form e.g., cigarette, pipe or cigar, can increase your risk of oral cancel six times over nonsmokers with similar general health.
  • Smokeless tobacco – snuff, or dip, or those who chew tobacco, or its derivatives, stand 50 times greater risk of developing oral cancers.
  • Alcohol – Alcohol drinkers are nearly six times as likely to develop mouth cancer as non-drinkers.  
  • Genetic Tendencies – People with the incidence of cancer in the family are at a greater risk.
  • Exposure to sun – Excessive exposure to the sun, especially at a young age, can cause cancers.
  • HPV (Human papillomavirus) – Some strains of HPV are associated with OSCC (Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

What Should One Do?

If you observe any one or more of the symptoms discussed above, do not delay contacting your dentist. One of the most effective protection against oral cancer is optimal hygiene maintenance and regular checkup visits to your dentist. During each checkup visit, your dentist will perform oral cancer screening so that any malignancy can be detected and treated in a timely manner. Remember, oral cancer can be easily treated if it is diagnosed in early stages. Visit your dentist immediately if you feel any lump or swelling which is not going away.

 

Is Invisalign Really Better Than Braces?

Is Invisalign really better than braces

Modern dentistry is making progress leaps and bounds to offer functional and cosmetic improvements to your smile. Traditional braces have dominated the scene of orthodontics for decades, but clear aligners are now gaining ground. Invisalign is a branded clear aligner system for the correction of misaligned teeth. It has the distinction of being the pioneer in the field of clear aligners. Invisalign has clearly taken the field of orthodontics by storm due to its multiple merits. But is Invisalign really better than braces? That is a moot question. We cannot decide it for you but certainly, we can give you information which will help you make an educated decision.

The dental Braces

There are many forms of dental braces, which are all variations on the basic traditional braces. So, only the traditional braces will be described. These consist essentially of a strong steel wire called the archwire because it forms an arch around your teeth. To this archwire are attached tiny brackets, one bracket being firmly attached to each tooth.



Once the archwire is attached, the teeth start to move in the direction desired by your dentist. As the teeth move, the forces on them diminish. As a result, the movement slows down. Your dentist will adjust the tension in the archwire again and the teeth start moving again. This process is repeated fortnightly or monthly till the teeth take the positions as planned by your dentist.

This process can take two to three years depending on the complexity of the case. After the desired movement of teeth has been achieved it must be consolidated. Else, the teeth tend to revert back to their old positions. Sometimes, the dentist may have to extract one or two teeth to make space for the proper movement of the remaining teeth.

The Invisalign

Invisalign is one of the clear aligners on the market, and a branded offer of the Invisalign company. This system was developed by an engineer who wanted to overcome the problems he saw with the braces. The aligners are a set of numbered shells made of clear bpa free plastic which are made specifically for your teeth using leading-edge technology and orthodontic expertise.

These shells, or aligners, are to be worn on your teeth, you only remove your aligner is for eating or drinking. The first shell is so made that it exerts forces on individual teeth according to a plan made out by the dentist in advance. In about two weeks’ time, the aligner has moved your teeth to an intermediate position in the right direction and the forces on the teeth diminish (as also in the case of braces). At this time, you discard the first aligner and put on the second aligner in the set. This one is also worn for two weeks and moves your teeth further. Similarly, the third one and the subsequent ones move your teeth gradually to the final, desired position.

pros and cons

  • Braces Vs Aligners; Method of Fabrication

There is not much custom fabrication required in the case of braces. Dentists use readymade wires, brackets, and other minor components. But the aligners have to be custom made for you using state of the art computing and manufacturing facilities. Your dentist will take x-rays and make impressions of your teeth and digitizes them into a computer loaded with a custom-made software. A three-dimensional image of your teeth and jaws is made on the computer. The software is able to display various views of your teeth on the computer screen. With the help of this data and sophisticated software, the dentist plans the movement of your teeth through intermediate stages to a final optimum position.

Your dentist will tune up the movement plan and the number of intermediate stages. He or she may even show you the smile you should expect to possess after the treatment is completed. Once the plan is finalized, the data is transferred to computer-aided machines which produce the set of aligners for you. These aligners are machined out of special grade clear plastic which is invisible and biocompatible. These aligners are pre-numbered in accordance with the order in which those are to be worn.

  • Braces Vs Aligners; Aesthetics 

A major snag with the braces should now be obvious to you. The archwire and the brackets are visible and will look odd when you smile. Various efforts have been made to counter this drawback, for example, tooth-colored brackets and archwires. Lingual braces are worn on the insides of the teeth, but due to limited space, they can interfere with proper tongue movement. In fact, some people may not have enough space to allow lingual braces. And the tooth-colored wires are not really invisible after all. The Invisalign aligner system, in contrast, is made entirely from clear plastic which is virtually invisible.

  • Braces Vs Aligners; Treatment Time

 Treatment time varies from case to case, but generally, the treatment time is less for braces. This is because braces exert higher orthodontic forces which move your teeth more quickly in the desired direction. Treatment time with Invisalign aligners also takes longer because its efficacy is dependent on patient compliance in wearing.

  • Braces Vs Aligners; Number of Visits and Convenience

 The braces need to be readjusted periodically. The patient has to get an appointment and visit the clinic. The Invisalign has the advantage that the patient is given all the aligners at once. Then he or she can move on to the next aligner without having to go to the dentist again and again.

  • Braces Vs Aligners; Inconvenience 

 Since braces have wires, which must be cut to size and bent using hand tools, sharp edges may remain and bruise the cheeks etc. The plastic aligners do not have such a disadvantage. In fact, they are quite comfortable to wear.

  • Braces Vs Aligners; Corrective Range

 Can Invisalign correct all the dental defects which braces can? No. Invisalign can only be used for the correction of mild to moderate orthodontic problems. The braces, on the other hand, can correct a much larger range of orthodontic problems.

  • Braces Vs Aligners; Cost of Treatment 

Since it is a cosmetic orthodontic system, treatment with Invisalign aligners is more expensive. In the case of brackets, the cost is relatively less. However, the actual cost of your treatment depends on the severity of your case.

  • Braces Vs Aligners; Treatment for Teens

Braces will be effective at all ages where tooth movement can be achieved. Early designs of Invisalign were not suitable for teens because new teeth would not find any room to erupt, Later designs incorporate removable tabs to allow for erupting teeth.

  • Braces Vs Aligners; Oral health

Braces are permanently installed by the dentist and can only be removed by the dentist. The wires and brackets make oral hygiene complicated. On the other hand, the Invisalign can be put on and removed by the user at will for eating and cleaning. The teeth can be brushed and flossed before putting the aligners back on, this should be done to avoid staining.

Which One Should I Choose Then?

This question is difficult to answer because the information we have given you is not really sufficient for you to make the correct decision. If your dentist thinks your case beyond correction by Invisalign, you have no choice.

In case Invisalign can correct your defect then the decision will be based on your aesthetic preferences and your financial options. It is best to consult a good orthodontist and then take a decision.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are You Afraid Of The Dentist?

Today’s the day you’re visiting the dentist for your annual check-up and teeth cleaning.  Let me guess, you’re starting to come down with a fever?  Your mind is telling you to reschedule for another day so you can re-arrange your sock drawer.  Your palms are sweaty and you hear the sound of the drill in your ears even though you’re only going for a check-up.

These are exactly the types of tricks of the mind that replay not only when visiting the dentist.  Anything we fear can have such a tight grip over us physically, mentally and emotionally that it’s amazing the extremes we will go to in our minds in anticipation of what “might” happen.  I know, I know, your mind told you it’s “going” to happen but I ask you, how often have the fears in your mind actually come true?

In some of the contemplative philosophies, we call this the “monkey mind”.  It has a tendency to run wild and wreak havoc.  Not only does it wreak havoc with our thoughts and emotions, our body bears the burden of all these unsettling thoughts and emotions.  This my friends, is what we call stress.



Please let me explain. Stress is understanding we live in the feeling of our thinking. The emotional response of our thinking (perception) drives our behaviors or lifestyle choices. It’s these choices that are getting us into trouble. When we become willing to mindfully peel back the layers and examine the nature of how we’re translating daily events, interactions and beliefs to ourselves and those around us, we can begin to make modifications to our thought patterns which will in turn change our emotional and behavioral response to them.  Isn’t that great news.  We can fix your fear of the dentist!

“Breathe, Perceive, Receive”

The stress response system is also known as the “fight or flight” system. We process thoughts in a hyper-vigilant state of being in the amygdala and they get stuck in “distress” thinking patterns. We “perceive” threat in this system and are designed to take action against this perceived.  Our body and mind believe they’re in danger and operate biochemically and physiologically in this fashion.

Now, since I’m sure your dentist is a very nice person and you’re not actually in any danger, here’s some basic physiology we’re going to work with first to calm our body/mind and shift from “threat” into calmer states of awareness that are experienced from the relaxation response of our autonomic nervous system.

I like to begin with 5 easy tips to begin simplifying stress. They all focus on creating homeostasis in the body/mind by bringing the autonomic nervous system into balance. To move from threat to thrive, we begin with our breath.  How we’re breathing is influencing our biochemistry, biomechanics, physiology & psychology.  And when stressed, it’s the first thing we lose sight of.  We move into mouth breathing or a shallow nasal breath that signals the brain to operate in the “fight or flight” mode.  

An optimal state of health is taking 12 breaths or less per minute.  Specifically, nasal diaphragmatic breathing which allows us to engage our diaphragm muscle and reach the relaxation nerve endings in the lower lobes of our lungs. To breathe at a pace of 12 breaths or less, we consciously pay attention to the length, depth and pace of our inhale and exhale.

Incorporating breathing techniques is something you can easily do in preparation for your appointment and during your appointment.  While in the dentist chair, breathe and re-pattern your thoughts into thoughts that are reflective of the positive experience that’s actually happening in that moment.  As you change the story from a calmer place in the body/mind, the change becomes permanent.  

Discover your “life with breath” for optimal health and well-being.

This is a guest post by Ed Harrold

Ed HarroldEd Harrold is an author, inspirational leader, public speaker, coach and educator. Ed’s mastery in the science of mindful breathing has guided him to apply conscious breathing practices in corporate performance coaching, fitness & athletic training, healthcare trainings, stress reduction and overall health and well-being.  

Today, Ed blends the fields of neuroscience and the wisdom of contemplative traditions into effective strategies to improve well-being in Corporate America, Healthcare, athletic performance and individual health. Ed’s fluency in mindfulness-based strategies combined with the belief in the human potential gives him the depth and understanding to meet individuals and group needs across industries and platforms.

Ed is the Author of “Life With Breath IQ + EQ = NEW YOU”.  He is a contributing health & wellness editor for Huffingtpost, Thrive Global, MindBodyGreen, PTOnTheNet, & Corporate Wellness Magazine.  Experience Ed’s MindBodyAthlete™, Executive Coaching, Simplicity of Stress & professional CME trainings nationally & internationally.  Learn more about Ed at www.edharrold.com

Kelloggs to reduce the amount of sugar in their cereal

sugar

As pressure mounts for people to cut down on the amount of sugar they have in their diet it comes as welcome news to hear that Kellogg’s are doing their part. Since the beginning of this year Coco Pops have contained 14% less sugar, other items in the branding range such as Frosties have also had a 30% reduction in the sugar content. The Original Wheats range continues to have no added sugar.

More information about sugary cereals and naming and shaming those with the highest sugar content is here.

Why is cutting down sugar so important?

Public Health England has challenged businesses to cut sugar by 20% by 2020, this could lead to 200,000 tons of sugar being removed from the UK market. The problem with added sugar is that it contributes to a number of diseases, most notably tooth decay and diabetes.

What is the link between sugar and tooth decay?

We all have bacteria in our mouth, this is quite normal, as these bacteria digests their food they excrete acid and it is this acid which attacks the enamel. As the enamel attack progresses decay can set in which can ultimately lead to tooth loss if left to progress unchecked. The bacteria feed excitedly on sugar and so reducing the amount of sugar reduces the amount of acid these bacteria excrete.



Read more about why sugar is so bad for your teeth.

At the moment the 20% reduction challenge by Public Health England is voluntary however a Soft Drinks Industry Levy (SDIL), otherwise known as ‘sugar tax’  is set to begin from April 2018.

Questions about the sugar tax?

Will the price of soft drinks go up?

Not necessarily, says the government website. If producers can find ways to reduce the amount of sugar in their drinks then the amount of tax they pay will go down, possibly even to nothing at all. There is also no requirement to pass on this tax to consumers.

What drinks will have the sugar tax?

Any drinks which have added sugar and sugar content over 5g/100ml will incur a tax. The tax is banded and will increase with more sugar, currently this will increase at 8g/100ml. Any drink which does not contain added sugar will not be taxed such as fruit drinks.

As you can see, the government is doing its part to reduce sugar, producers are doing their part… You doing yours also?

Image source: freedigitalphotos.net

Now is the time to start your dental treatment in time for a white smile at Christmas

Christmas white smile[This blog post was written on 28/11/17 and all dates and timescales are based upon this date.]

  • 66% of adults in the UK have visible plaque [1]
  • 48% of the population are unhappy with the look of their teeth
  • 31% of adults have tooth decay.

 

For the 66% of adults that have visible plaque it’s not too late to get this removed for (allegedly) one of the happiest times of the year, Christmas. For the 48% of the population that are unhappy with the look of their teeth there’s also still time to do something about it, ready for all those photographs. But what about if you’re in the 31% of adults with tooth decay, is there still time for you to act? Oh yes, read on to find out what you can do to get your teeth and smile sorted for Christmas.

What dental treatments are available in time for Christmas?

Dental health treatments

With many dental practices now offering direct access for hygienists And hygienists offering a wider range of treatments there really is no reason why you can’t have visible signs of teeth staining removed prior to Christmas.



If one of the reasons you don’t smile is because your gums are red and puffy then you may have gingivitis, this can often take a few weeks to sort out so again, you just about have enough time before Christmas to resolve this dental health problem.

Most dentists near you will offer dental hygiene treatments, you should expect to pay for these privately as they are often not available with our hygienist on the NHS. Typically this will cost you between £50 and £100… Could this be a Christmas present to yourself?

Cosmetic dental treatments

Some cosmetic dental treatments such as orthodontics take longer to undertake and there is now not enough time to straighten teeth with braces prior to Christmas, however, restorative treatments such as dental veneers or crowns made just have enough time (time of writing 28/11/17).

If you have surface stains on your teeth you might like to ask your dentist or hygienist about mild air abrasion.  This uses a very light blasting medium to gently remove surface stains from your teeth, the treatment can be low-cost, quick and painless but is only suitable  if your teeth are stained on the surface. It cannot remove any deeper ingrained stains or change the colour of your teeth itself.

One of the treatments you definitely have time for before Christmas is teeth whitening, whitening can take anywhere from a few hours (with in surgery whitening) or a couple of weeks with home whitening. If you’d like to have whiter teeth for those Christmas photographs then we recommend you contact your dentist within the next day or so to avoid disappointment.

A word of warning about teeth whitening in a beauty salon… Don’t!

campaign for safe tooth whitening

A busy time of year

Many industries find that Christmas is an extremely busy time of year, dentistry is no different. So many people are wanting to have their smiles bright and fresh ready for the festive season, you don’t have much longer to go if you are to get an appointment in time to have your problem resolved.

Whatever you are waiting for… Don’t wait any longer and contact your dental practice TODAY.

References

[1] www.nationalsmilemonth.org/facts-figures/

Image source: freedigitalphotos.net

 

New statistics show that fewer than one in 20 people visit their dentist.

Millions of Brits are only cleaning three quarters of their teeth, a study has found.

Despite the average adult spending the recommended two minutes cleaning their teeth, almost half admit they are often missing out at least a quarter of their pearly whites.

One in twenty even admitted to only getting the brush on half of their teeth – leaving the other half covered in the day’s acid, plaque and debris.

It also emerged less than half (48 per cent) of people see their dentist at least twice a year, with more than one in ten only making an appointment when they have a problem.

A shocking one in twenty NEVER see their dentist.



The study was commissioned by a consortium of dentists behind Brushlink, the first smartphone ‘tooth brushing tracker’ which coaches people on how to clean their teeth and gives them a score out of 100.

Dr Dev Patel, founder of Brushlink said: “As a practising dentist, I have always been shocked by the lack of feedback between patient and dentist.

“We have always had to rely on what we see inside the mouth every six months rather than having any reliable data about how people are brushing.

“I invented Brushlink to plug this gap by providing coaching to patients but also accurate monitoring of everything they are doing with their toothbrush between dentist visits.”

The study of more than 2,000 adults found the younger generation are most likely to miss teeth when brushing, with just three in ten 18-34-year-olds saying they cover all of them.

But this rises to 55 per cent of the over 55s.

It also emerged more than six in ten adults have never been shown how to brush their teeth properly.

And just one in ten parents supervise their children brushing their teeth twice a day.

Almost a fifth of mums and dads admitted their kids occasionally lie about brushing their teeth by pretending to have done it when they haven’t.

Another 12 per cent even said their children have tricked them into thinking they have cleaned their teeth by doing things such as wetting the brush head to make it look like it has been used.

Thorough tooth brushing is recognised as the foundation of good oral health regimes, and an effective way to avoid tooth decay and gum disease.

But almost a quarter of adults say someone in their household has had dental problems which they believe could have been prevented by better brushing.

Each week, more than 1 million patients in the UK use NHS dental services – many of them seeking treatment for dental disease, the consequences of which costs the NHS a huge £3.4bn a year.

Professor Elizabeth Kay MBE, Foundation Dean Peninsula Dental School, Oral Health Topic Expert for NICE and a Brushlink Scientific Committee member, added: “This survey has revealed some intriguing insights into our oral health regimes and patients’ relationships with the dental health professionals who care for them.

“There is no substitute for good tooth brushing practices when it comes to maintaining a healthy mouth, yet it would appear from the survey that there is a lot more that we can all do to achieve this effectively.

“The fact that this survey is in association with the launch of a new dental care product – and one which I think is the most amazing oral health product that I have seen in a long time – should encourage people to takes its findings seriously, as it has been commissioned by a group of dentists who are passionate about improving the oral health of the nation.”

Article Source: Mat Mccabe at  https://www.newsanyway.com/2017/11/10/shocking-one-twenty-never-see-dentist/

The singing dentist does Thriller

The singing dentist does it again with a smash hit for Halloween entitled filler… Or is it driller? Or even Thriller? Who knows…

It’s great fun following the singing dentist on Facebook, his early videos were just a recording in front of a mobile phone in the dental practice… Nowadays budgets seem to be bigger, better and leading to some of the funniest (And informative) dental videos on the Internet.

With over 86,000 subscribers on YouTube and 432,000 fans on Facebook no one can argue with the reach that Milad Shadrooh has – We are fully in support of  his unique way of handing out dental information and advice.

Watch his latest video here.

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